Losing Trick Count - Examples

1.
  K Q 4 3
  A 9 5
  K 7 6
  K 8 5
LTC
1
2
2
  2  
Losers total 7
2.
  K Q 4 3
  A 9 5
  K 7 6
  8 5 2
LTC
1
2
2
  3  
Losers total 8
3.
  K Q 8 4
  A 8 5 2
  K 7 6
  8 5
LTC
1
2
2
  2  
Losers total 7
4.
  K Q 8 4 3
  A J 9 8
  7 6
  8 5
LTC
1
2
2
  2  
Losers total 7
5.
  K Q 8 4 3
  A J 9 8 5
  7 6
  5
LTC
1
2
2
  1  
Losers total 6

History of the LTC   (Source : ACBL Encyclopedia, 2011 Edition)
The principle assessing a bridge hand in terms of counting "losers" was first put forward in 1934 by F. Dudley Courtenay in his book "The System the Experts Play".
The system remained in semi-obscurity for some time but was revived by Maurice Harrison-Gray.

The LTC formed an integral part of the Roman System developed by Walter Avarelli and Giorgio Belladonna, two of the members of the most successful Bridge team ever, the Italian Blue Team.
The Roman System was instrumental in the Blue Team's long period of Bridge-world dominance, winning seven World Championships as well as many other International Tournaments between 1956 and their retirement in 1969.

In Australia the LTC became increasingly popular from the late 1980s onwards, after Ron Klinger's outstanding book "The Modern Losing Trick Count" first published in 1987. (Thirteenth impression of 2009, by the Orion Publishing Group Ltd., London, UK)

MF.